Which Safety Glass Should I Use For My Storefront? Laminate or Tempered?

Which Safety Glass Should I Use For My Storefront? Laminate or Tempered?

Laminated glass vs. tempered glass for commercial doors: Which is better?

When choosing glass for commercial doors, there are two main types to consider: laminated glass and tempered glass. Both types of glass offer a number of benefits, but they also have some key differences.

Laminated glass is made up of two or more layers of glass that are bonded together with a thin layer of plastic. This plastic layer, called the interlayer, holds the glass together even if it is broken. This makes laminated glass much safer than regular glass, as it is less likely to shatter and cause injuries.

Tempered glass is a type of safety glass that is created by heating and then rapidly cooling regular glass. This process makes the glass much stronger and more resistant to breakage. Tempered glass is also more resistant to thermal shock, which means that it is less likely to crack or break due to sudden changes in temperature.

Which type of glass is better for commercial doors?

The best type of glass for commercial doors depends on the specific needs of the application. If security is the primary concern, then laminated glass is the better choice. Laminated glass is more difficult to break, and it will hold together even if it is broken, making it more difficult for intruders to gain entry.

If durability and impact resistance are the primary concerns, then tempered glass is the better choice. Tempered glass is much stronger than regular glass, and it is also more resistant to thermal shock.

Here is a table that summarizes the key differences between laminated glass and tempered glass:

FeatureLaminated glassTempered glass
StrengthWeaker than tempered glassStronger than laminated glass
Impact resistanceMore impact-resistant than regular glassMore impact-resistant than regular glass
SecurityMore secure than tempered glassLess secure than laminated glass
DurabilityLess durable than tempered glassMore durable than regular glass
Thermal shock resistanceLess resistant to thermal shock than tempered glassMore resistant to thermal shock than regular glass
CostMore expensive than tempered glassLess expensive than laminated glass

Applications for laminated glass and tempered glass

Laminated glass is often used in commercial applications where security is a top priority, such as banks, jewelry stores, and government buildings. It is also used in applications where safety is a concern, such as shower doors and storefronts.

Tempered glass is often used in commercial applications where durability and impact resistance are important, such as office buildings, restaurants, and shopping malls. It is also used in applications where thermal shock resistance is important, such as oven doors and kitchen backsplashes.

Conclusion

Both laminated glass and tempered glass offer a number of benefits for commercial doors. The best type of glass to choose depends on the specific needs of the application. If security is the primary concern, then laminated glass is the better choice. If durability and impact resistance are the primary concerns, then tempered glass is the better choice.

What Steps Do I Take to Cut a Piece of Single or Double-Strength Glass?

What Steps Do I Take to Cut a Piece of Single or Double-Strength Glass?

Have you ever wondered how to cut single-strength or double-strength glass? Cutting glass itself isn’t difficult, however, it does require a steady hand, the ability to measure, proper tools, and knowing the thickness of the glass.

5 Simple steps on how to cut a piece of single or double-strength glass:

  1. Prepare the work area. Make sure the work area is clean and free of debris. You will also need a cutting mat, a glass cutter, a straightedge, and safety glasses.
  2. Measure the glass. Use a ruler or measuring tape to mark the desired dimensions on the glass.
  3. Score the glass. Place the glass cutter on the glass at the start of the cut line. Apply firm, even pressure and pull the cutter towards you in a smooth, continuous motion. The glass cutter will leave a small, even score line in the glass.
  4. Snap the glass. Place the glass on a flat non-scratchable surface, score side down. Apply pressure to the center of the score line and bend the glass in opposite directions. The glass should snap cleanly along the score line. It may work better to place a No. 2 pencil about 2 inches under beside the score line to help get a clean break.
  5. Finish the edges. Use a glass file or sandpaper to smooth out any sharp edges on the glass. Swift hands on this step, no need to apply hard pressure as you are just smoothing the edges so they are not rough.

Safety tips to keep in mind when cutting glass:

  • Always wear safety glasses when cutting glass.
  • Avoid applying too much pressure when scoring the glass, or you could shatter it.
  • When snapping the glass, be careful not to cut yourself on the sharp edges.
  • If you are not comfortable cutting glass, it is best to reach out to Discount Glass and Screen and we can do it for you!
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